China’s Lunar Rover Studies Stones On Moon’s Far Side

China’s lunar rover has conducted scientific detection on some stones on the far side of the moon, which might help scientists find out whether they are from outer space or native to the moon.

 

The rover Yutu-2, or Jade Rabbit-2, was sent to the Von Karman Crater in the South Pole-Aitken Basin on the far side of the moon on Jan. 3 in the Chang’e-4 mission.

 

Currently, the rover has traveled about 127 meters on the moon, and is taking a “noon break” as the temperature on the moon rises extremely high. It’s scheduled to resume work on March 10 and switch to its dormant mode on March 13, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

 

Scientists said the rover has conducted scientific detection on its tracks and nearby stones. The largest stone detected has a diameter of about 20 cm, and the rover came as close as 1.2 meters to it.

 

Experts from the National Space Science Center under the Chinese Academy of Sciences said they want to figure out the origin of the stones, whether they are aboriginal on the moon, or meteorites from outer space. If they are aboriginal, what is the physical process of their formation?

 

Scientists said it’s just the beginning of the scientific journey of the Jade Rabbit-2, and they expect more interesting discoveries.

 

Source: Xinhua